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dc.contributor.authorGeoffrion, Steve
dc.contributor.authorSader, Josette
dc.contributor.authorOuellet, Frédéric
dc.contributor.authorBoivin, Rémi
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-16T16:18:11Z
dc.date.availableNO_RESTRICTIONfr
dc.date.available2016-05-16T16:18:11Z
dc.date.issued2015-05
dc.identifier.citationGeoffrion, Steve, Sader, Josette, Ouellet, Frédéric & Boivin, Rémi (2015). Aggressive incidents inside a Montreal barroom involving patrons, barmaids and bouncers : a micro level examination of routine activity theory. Crime science, 4(9), 1-10.fr
dc.identifier.urihttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s40163-015-0020-y
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1866/13842
dc.subjectAggressive incidentsfr
dc.subjectBarroomfr
dc.subjectRoutine activityfr
dc.subjectBouncer-ethnographerfr
dc.subjectAggressive incidents inside a Montreal barroom involving patronsfr
dc.subjectBarmaids and bouncers: A micro level examination of routine activity theoryfr
dc.titleAggressive incidents inside a Montreal barroom involving patrons, barmaids and bouncers : a micro level examination of routine activity theoryfr
dc.typeArticlefr
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversité de Montréal. Faculté des arts et des sciences. École de psychoéducationfr
UdeM.statutProfesseur(e) / Professorfr
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s40163-015-0020-y
dcterms.abstractObjectives: This article further examines the phenomenon of aggression inside barrooms by relying on the “bouncer-ethnographer” methodology. The objective is to investigate variations in aggression through time and space according to the role and routine of the target in a Montreal barroom. Thus, it provides an examination of routine activity theory at the micro level: the barroom. Methods: For a period of 258 nights of observation in a Canadian barroom, bouncers completed reports on each intervention and provided specific information regarding what happened, when and where within the venue. In addition, the bouncer-ethnographer compiled field observations and interviews with bar personnel in order to identify aggression hotspots and “rush hours” for three types of actors within barrooms: (a) bouncers, (b) barmaids and (c) patrons. Findings: Three different patterns emerged for shifting hotspots of aggression depending on the target. As the night progresses, aggressive incidents between patrons, towards barmaids and towards bouncers have specific hotspots and rush hours influenced by the specific routine of the target inside the barroom. Implications: The current findings enrich those of previous work by pointing to the relevance of not only examining the environmental characteristics of the barroom, but also the role of the target of aggression. Crime opportunities follow routine activities, even within a specific location on a micro level. Routine activity theory is thus relevant in this context, because as actors in differing roles follow differing routines, as do their patterns of victimization.fr
dcterms.bibliographicCitationCrime science ; vol. 4, no 9
dcterms.isPartOfurn:ISSN:2193-7680
dcterms.languageengfr
UdeM.VersionRioxxVersion acceptée / Accepted Manuscript


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