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dc.contributor.authorFleury, Samuel
dc.contributor.authorBoukhatem, Imane
dc.contributor.authorLe Blanc, Jessica
dc.contributor.authorWelman, Mélanie
dc.contributor.authorLordkipanidzé, Marie
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-12T17:00:26Z
dc.date.availableNO_RESTRICTIONfr
dc.date.available2021-02-12T17:00:26Z
dc.date.issued2021-02-11
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fimmu.2021.606861/full
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1866/24842
dc.publisherFrontiers mediafr
dc.rightsCe document est mis à disposition selon les termes de la Licence Creative Commons Paternité 4.0 International. / This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectPlateletfr
dc.subjectNeurotrophin receptorsfr
dc.subjectTropomyosin receptor kinase Bfr
dc.subjectBrain-derived neurotrophic factorfr
dc.subjectPan-neurotrophic receptor p75NTRfr
dc.titleTissue-specificity of antibodies raised against TrkB and p75NTR receptors ; implications for platelets as models of neurodegenerative diseasesfr
dc.typeArticlefr
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversité de Montréal. Faculté de pharmaciefr
dcterms.abstractPlatelets and neurons share many similarities including comparable secretory granule types with homologous calcium-dependent secretory mechanisms as well as internalization, sequestration and secretion of many neurotransmitters. Thus, platelets present a high potential to be used as peripheral biomarkers to reflect neuronal pathologies. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) acts as a neuronal growth factor involved in learning and memory through the binding of two receptors, the tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) and the 75 kDa pan-neurotrophic receptor (p75NTR). In addition to its expression in the central nervous system, BDNF is found in much greater quantities in blood circulation, where it is largely stored within platelets. Levels 100- to 1,000-fold those of neurons make platelets the most important peripheral reservoir of BDNF. This led us to hypothesize that platelets would express canonical BDNF receptors, i.e., TrkB and p75NTR, and that the receptors on platelets would bear significant resemblance to the ones found in the brain. However, herein we report discrepancies regarding detection of these receptors using antibody-based assays, with antibodies displaying important tissue-specificity. The currently available antibodies raised against TrkB and p75NTR should therefore be used with caution to study platelets as models for neurological disorders. Rigorous characterization of antibodies and bioassays appears critical to understand the interplay between platelet and neuronal biology of BDNF.fr
dcterms.isPartOfurn:ISSN:1664-3224fr
dcterms.languageengfr
UdeM.ReferenceFournieParDeposanthttps://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2021.606861fr
UdeM.VersionRioxxVersion publiée / Version of Recordfr
oaire.citationTitleFrontiers in immunologyfr


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Ce document est mis à disposition selon les termes de la Licence Creative Commons Paternité 4.0 International. / This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
RightsCe document est mis à disposition selon les termes de la Licence Creative Commons Paternité 4.0 International. / This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

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