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Expressive and receptive use of speech and graphic symbols by typically developing children: What skills contribute to performance on structured sentence-level tasks?

dc.contributor.authorSutton, Ann
dc.contributor.authorTrudeau, Natacha
dc.contributor.authorMorford, Jill P.
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Martine M.
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-02T15:45:11Z
dc.date.availableMONTHS_WITHHELD:12fr
dc.date.available2021-02-02T15:45:11Z
dc.date.issued2020-05-04
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1866/24677
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisfr
dc.subjectExpressive use of graphic symbolsfr
dc.subjectReceptive use of graphic symbolsfr
dc.subjectSentence-level graphic symbol utterancesfr
dc.subjectCluster analysisfr
dc.subjectIndividual differencesfr
dc.titleExpressive and receptive use of speech and graphic symbols by typically developing children: What skills contribute to performance on structured sentence-level tasks?fr
dc.typeArticlefr
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversité de Montréal. Faculté de médecine. École d'orthophonie et d'audiologiefr
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17549507.2020.1756406
dcterms.abstractPurpose: To explore expressive and receptive use of speech and graphic symbols and relationships with linguistic and cognitive skills in children with typical development. Method: Participants were 82 children with typical development (4 to 9 years). Measures of memory, visual analysis skills, and receptive language were used, along with five experimental tasks with speech or symbols as input (stimulus) or output (response), using single clause and compound clause stimuli. Cluster analysis grouped participants with similar performances patterns, who were then compared on linguistic and cognitive skill measures. Result: The lowest performing group sometimes accurately interpreted graphic symbol utterances that were visible during responding. The mid-performing group was stronger on expressive than receptive symbol utterances when the model did not remain visible. The highest group was comparable on expressive and receptive symbol tasks, but nonetheless stronger with spoken utterances. Relationships of linguistic and cognitive skills with task performance differed across the clusters. Conclusion: The findings help clarify the input-output modality asymmetry in graphic symbol communication. Spoken language proficiency does not directly transfer to sentence-level expressive and receptive graphic symbol use. Exploring potentially challenging sentence-level phenomena is important. Research is warranted to explore developmental progressions and potential clinical applications more systematically.fr
dcterms.alternativeExpressive and receptive use of graphic symbolsfr
dcterms.isPartOfurn:ISSN:1754-9507fr
dcterms.isPartOfurn:ISSN:1754-9515fr
dcterms.languageengfr
UdeM.ReferenceFournieParDeposantAnn Sutton, Natacha Trudeau, Jill P. Morford & Martine M. Smith (2020): Expressive and receptive use of speech and graphic symbols by typically developing children: What skills contribute to performance on structured sentence-level tasks?, International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, DOI: 10.1080/17549507.2020.1756406fr
UdeM.VersionRioxxVersion acceptée / Accepted Manuscriptfr
oaire.citationTitleInternational journal of speech-language pathologyfr


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