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dc.contributor.authorNeves Briard, Joël
dc.contributor.authorGrou-Boileau, Frédéric
dc.contributor.authorEl Bashtaly, Alaa
dc.contributor.authorSpenard, Catherine
dc.contributor.authorDe Champlain, François
dc.contributor.authorHomier, Valérie
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-25T14:42:54Z
dc.date.availableNO_RESTRICTIONfr
dc.date.available2019-03-25T14:42:54Z
dc.date.issued2018-09-10
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1866/21507
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisfr
dc.subjectCardiac arrestfr
dc.subjectAutomated external defibrillatorfr
dc.subjectEmergency medical servicesfr
dc.subjectMobile appfr
dc.subjectEmergency medical dispatcherfr
dc.titleAutomated external defibrillator geolocalization with a mobile application, verbal assistance or no assistance : a pilot randomized simulation (AED G-MAP)fr
dc.typeArticlefr
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversité de Montréal. Faculté de médecine. Département de médecine de famille et médecine d'urgencefr
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10903127.2018.1511017
dcterms.abstractBackground: Shockable rythms are common among victims of witnessed public out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), but bystander defibrillation with a public automated external defibrillator (PAED) is rare. Instructions from the emergency medical dispatcher and mobile applications were developed to expedite the localization of PAEDs, but their effectiveness has not been compared. Methods: Participants were enrolled in a three-armed randomized simulation where they witnessed a simulated OHCA on a university campus, were instructed to locate a PAED and provide defibrillation. Participants were stratified and randomized to: (1) no assistance in finding the PAED, (2) assistance from a geolocalization mobile application (AED-Quebec), or (3) verbal assistance. Data collectors tracked each participant’s time elapsed and distance traveled to shock. Results: Of the 52 volunteers participating in the study (46% male, mean age 37), 17 were randomized to the no assistance group, 18 to the mobile application group and 17 to the verbal group. Median (IQR) time to shock was respectively 10:00 min (7:49-10:00), 9:44 (6:30-10:00), and 5:23 (4:11-9:08), with statistically significant differences between the verbal group and the other groups (p≤0.01). The success rate for defibrillation in <10 minutes was 35%, 56% and 76%. Multivariate regression of all participants pooled showed that knowledge of campus geography was the strongest predictor of shock in < 10 minutes (aOR = 14.3, 95% CI: 1.85-99.9). Among participants without prior geographical knowledge, verbal assistance provided a trend towards decreased time to shock, but the differences over no assistance (7:28 vs 10:00, p=0.10) and over the mobile app (7:28 vs 10:00, p=0.11) were not statistically significant. Conclusion: In a simulated environment, verbally providing OHCA bystanders with the nearest public AED’s location appeared to be effective in reducing the time to defibrillation in comparison to no assistance and to an AED geolocalizing mobile app, but further research is required to confirm this hypothesis, ascertain the external validity of these results and evaluate the real-life implications of these strategies.fr
dcterms.bibliographicCitationPrehospital emergency carefr
dcterms.isPartOfurn:ISSN:1090-3127fr
dcterms.isPartOfurn:ISSN:1545-0066fr
dcterms.languageengfr
UdeM.ReferenceFournieParDeposantDOI: 10.1080/10903127.2018.1511017fr
UdeM.VersionRioxxVersion acceptée / Accepted Manuscriptfr


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