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dc.contributor.authorLarivière, Vincent
dc.contributor.authorCostas, Rodrigo
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-31T16:23:12Z
dc.date.availableNO_RESTRICTIONfr
dc.date.available2020-03-31T16:23:12Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-28
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1866/23162
dc.publisherPublic library of sciencefr
dc.rightsCe document est mis à disposition selon les termes de la Licence Creative Commons Paternité 4.0 International. / This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleHow many is too many? : on the relationship between research productivity and impactfr
dc.typeArticlefr
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversité de Montréal. Faculté des arts et des sciences. École de bibliothéconomie et des sciences de l'informationfr
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0162709
dcterms.abstractOver the last few decades, the institutionalisation of quantitative research evaluations has created incentives for scholars to publish as many papers as possible. This paper assesses the effects of such incentives on individual researchers’ scientific impact, by analysing the relationship between their number of articles and their proportionof highly cited papers. In other words, does the share of an author’s top 1% most cited papers increase, remain stable, or decrease as his/her total number of papers increase? Using a large dataset of disambiguated researchers (N = 28,078,476) over the 1980–2013 period, this paper shows that, on average, the higher the number of papers a researcher publishes, the higher the proportion of these papers are amongst the most cited. This relationship is stronger for older cohorts of researchers, while decreasing returns to scale are observed for recent cohorts. On the whole, these results suggest that for established researchers, the strategy of publishing as many papers as possible did not yield lower shares of highly cited publications, but such a pattern is not always observed for younger scholars.fr
dcterms.isPartOfurn:ISSN:1932-6203fr
dcterms.languageengfr
UdeM.ReferenceFournieParDeposantLarivière V, Costas R (2016) How Many Is Too Many? On the Relationship between Research Productivity and Impact. PLoS ONE 11(9): e0162709. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0162709fr
UdeM.VersionRioxxVersion publiée / Version of Recordfr
oaire.citationTitlePLoS one
oaire.citationVolume11
oaire.citationIssue9


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Ce document est mis à disposition selon les termes de la Licence Creative Commons Paternité 4.0 International. / This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
RightsCe document est mis à disposition selon les termes de la Licence Creative Commons Paternité 4.0 International. / This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.