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dc.contributor.authorSolis, Mario
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-07T18:05:57Z
dc.date.available2013-06-07T18:05:57Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1866/9630
dc.publisherCentre de recherche en éthique de l'Université de Montréal
dc.subjectPhilosophyfr
dc.subjectPhilosophiefr
dc.subjectÉconomiefr
dc.subjectÉthiquefr
dc.subjectEthicsfr
dc.subjectEconomicsfr
dc.subjectJusticefr
dc.subjectGlobal justicefr
dc.subjectBasic Goods Principlefr
dc.titleGlobal Justice, Basic Goods and the Sufficiency Threshold Claimfr
dc.typeArticlefr
dcterms.abstractThis paper deals with a prevailing assumption that basic goods are accessory to claims of justice. Against such an assumption, the paper advances the idea that basic goods (the core of what I wish to call the sufficiency threshold) are fundamental as a matter of justice. The paper then addresses the question as to what is the elemental justifiability of a social minimum and how that relates to theories of justice, particularly to emerging theories of global justice. The arguments against the aforementioned assumption call upon the strengths of a general theory of justice already in place, namely, John Rawls’s theory of justice and the enriching response and criticism thereof—particularly David Miller’s theory of justice.fr
dcterms.bibliographicCitationÉthique et Économique / Ethics and Economics ; vol. 10, no 2
dcterms.isPartOfurn:ISSN:1639-1306
dcterms.languageengfr
UdeM.VersionRioxxVersion publiée / Version of Record


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