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dc.contributor.authorVitaro, Frank
dc.contributor.authorBrendgren, Mara
dc.contributor.authorGirard, Alain
dc.contributor.authorBoivin, Michel
dc.contributor.authorDionne, Ginette
dc.contributor.authorTremblay, Richard Ernest
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-25T20:08:43Z
dc.date.availableNO_RESTRICTIONfr
dc.date.available2018-09-25T20:08:43Z
dc.date.issued2015-07
dc.identifier.urihttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10964-015-0296-y
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1866/20937
dc.publisherSpringerfr
dc.subjectAntisocial behaviorfr
dc.subjectBehavior geneticsfr
dc.subjectTwinsfr
dc.subjectGroup normsfr
dc.subjectGene-environment interactionfr
dc.subjectPre-adolescentsfr
dc.titleThe expression of genetic risk for aggressive and non-aggressive antisocial behavior is moderated by peer groupfr
dc.typeArticlefr
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversité de Montréal. Faculté des arts et des sciences. École de psychoéducationfr
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversité de Montréal. Faculté de médecine. Département de psychiatriefr
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10964-015-0296-y
dcterms.abstractNumerous studies have shown that aggressive and non-aggressive antisocial behaviors are important precursors of later adjustment problems. There is also strong empirical evidence that both types of antisocial behavior are partially influenced by genetic factors. However, despite its important theoretical and practical implications, no study has examined the question whether environmental factors differentially moderate the expression of genetic influences on the two types of antisocial behavior. Using a genetically informed design based on 266 monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs, this study examined whether the expression of genetic risk for aggressive and non-aggressive antisocial behavior varies depending on the peer group’s injunctive norms (i.e., the degree of acceptability) of each type of antisocial behavior. Self-reported aggressive and non-aggressive antisocial behavior and classroom-based sociometric nominations were collected when participants were 10 years old. Multivariate genetic analyses revealed some common genetic factors influencing both types of antisocial behavior (i.e., general antisocial behavior) as well as genetic influences specific to non-aggressive antisocial behavior. However, genetic influences on general antisocial behavior, as well as specific genetic influences on non-aggressive antisocial behavior, vary depending on the injunctive classroom norms regarding these behaviors. These findings speak to the power of peer group norms in shaping aggressive and non-aggressive antisocial behavior. They also contribute further to understanding the distinctive development of both types of antisocial behavior. Finally, they may have important implications for prevention purposes.fr
dcterms.bibliographicCitationJournal of Youth and Adolescence ; vol. 44, no 7, p. 1379-1395fr
dcterms.isPartOfurn:ISSN:0047-2891fr
dcterms.languageengfr
UdeM.ReferenceFournieParDeposantVitaro, F., Brendgen, M., Girard, A., Boivin, M., Dionne, G. & Tremblay, R. E. (2015) The expression of genetic risk for aggressive and non-aggressive antisocial behavior is moderated by peer group norms. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 44(7), 1379-1395.fr
UdeM.VersionRioxxVersion acceptée / Accepted Manuscriptfr


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