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dc.contributor.authorde Montigny, Luc
dc.contributor.authorRoss, Dave
dc.contributor.authorDe Champlain, François
dc.contributor.authorSegal, Eli
dc.contributor.authorNeves Briard, Joël
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-06T13:12:33Z
dc.date.availableMONTHS_WITHHELD:6fr
dc.date.available2018-04-06T13:12:33Z
dc.date.issued2018-02-13
dc.identifier.citationNeves Briard J, de Montigny L, Ross D, de Champlain F, Segal E. Is distance to the nearest registered public automated defibrillator associated with the probability of bystander shock for victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest? Prehosp Disaster Med. 2018;33(2):153-159fr
dc.identifier.issn1049-023X
dc.identifier.issn1945-1938
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1866/19914
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressfr
dc.subjectArrêt cardiorespiratoire extra-hospitalierfr
dc.subjectDéfibrillation publiquefr
dc.subjectDéfibrillateur externe automatiséfr
dc.titleIs distance to the nearest registered public automated defibrillator associated with the probability of bystander shock for victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest?fr
dc.typeArticlefr
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversité de Montréal. Faculté de médecine. Département de médecine de famille et médecine d'urgencefr
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S1049023X18000080
dcterms.abstractIntroduction: Rapid access to defibrillation is a key element in the management of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs). Public automated external defibrillators (PAEDs) are becoming increasingly available, but little information exists regarding the relation between the proximity to the arrest and their usage in urban areas. Methods: This study is a retrospective, observational, cross-sectional analysis of non-traumatic OHCA during a 24-month period in the greater Montreal area (Quebec, Canada). Using logistic regression, bystander shock odds are described with regards to distance from the OHCA scene to the nearest PAED, adjusted for prehospital care arrival delay and time of day, and stratifying for type of location. Results: Out of a total of 2,443 OHCA victims identified, 77 (3%) received bystander PAED shock, 622 (26%) occurred out-of-home, and 743 (30%) occurred during business hours. When controlling for time (business hours versus other hours) and minimum response delay for prehospital care arrival, a marginal negative association was found between bystander shock and distance to the nearest PAED in logged meters (aOR=0.80; CI, 0.64-0.99) for out-of-home cardiac arrests. No significant association was found between distance and bystander shock for at-home arrests. Out-of-home victims had significantly higher odds of receiving bystander shock up to 175 meters of distance to a PAED inclusively (aOR=2.52; CI, 1.07-5.89). Conclusion: For out-of-home cardiac arrests, proximity to a PAED was associated with bystander shock in the greater Montreal area. Strategies aiming to increase accessibility and use of these life-saving devices could further expand this advantage by assisting bystanders in rapidly locating nearby PAEDs.fr
dcterms.bibliographicCitationPrehospital and Disaster Medicine ; vol. 33, no 2, p.153-159
dcterms.languageengfr
UdeM.VersionRioxxVersion acceptée / Accepted Manuscriptfr


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