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dc.contributor.authorMacMillan, Gwyneth A.
dc.contributor.authorGirard, Catherine
dc.contributor.authorChételat, John
dc.contributor.authorLaurion, Isabelle
dc.contributor.authorAmyot, Marc
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-10T19:43:51Z
dc.date.availableNO_RESTRICTIONfr
dc.date.available2017-08-10T19:43:51Z
dc.date.issued2015-06
dc.identifier.citationMacMillan, G. A., Girard, C., Chételat, J., Laurion, I., & Amyot, M. (2015). High methylmercury in Arctic and subarctic ponds is related to nutrient levels in the warming eastern Canadian Arctic. Environmental science & technology, 49(13), 7743-7753.fr
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1866/19008
dc.subjectMercuryfr
dc.subjectMethylmercuryfr
dc.subjectThaw Pondfr
dc.subjectArcticfr
dc.subjectSubarcticfr
dc.subjectLakefr
dc.titleHigh methylmercury in Arctic and subarctic ponds is related to nutrient levels in the warming eastern Canadian Arctic
dc.typeArticlefr
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversité de Montréal. Faculté des arts et des sciences. Département de sciences biologiquesfr
UdeM.statutÉtudiant(e) aux cycles supérieurs / Graduate Studentfr
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/acs.est.5b00763
dcterms.abstractPermafrost thaw ponds are ubiquitous in the eastern Canadian Arctic, yet little information exists on their potential as sources of methylmercury (MeHg) to freshwaters. They are microbially active and conducive to methylation of inorganic mercury, and are also affected by Arctic warming. This multiyear study investigated thaw ponds in a discontinuous permafrost region in the Subarctic taiga (Kuujjuarapik-Whapmagoostui, QC) and a continuous permafrost region in the Arctic tundra (Bylot Island, NU). MeHg concentrations in thaw ponds were well above levels measured in most freshwater ecosystems in the Canadian Arctic (>0.1 ng L−1). On Bylot, ice-wedge trough ponds showed significantly higher MeHg (0.3−2.2 ng L−1) than polygonal ponds (0.1−0.3 ng L−1) or lakes (<0.1 ng L−1). High MeHg was measured in the bottom waters of Subarctic thaw ponds near Kuujjuarapik (0.1−3.1 ng L−1). High water MeHg concentrations in thaw ponds were strongly correlated with variables associated with high inputs of organic matter (DOC, a320, Fe), nutrients (TP, TN), and microbial activity (dissolved CO2 and CH4). Thawing permafrost due to Arctic warming will continue to release nutrients and organic carbon into these systems and increase ponding in some regions, likely stimulating higher water concentrations of MeHg. Greater hydrological connectivity from permafrost thawing may potentially increase transport of MeHg from thaw ponds to neighboring aquatic ecosystems.fr
dcterms.bibliographicCitationEnvironmental Science and Technology ; vol. 49, no 13
dcterms.isPartOfurn:ISSN:0013-936X
dcterms.languageengfr
UdeM.VersionRioxxVersion acceptée / Accepted Manuscript


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